Dean Foods Files for Bankruptcy

Dean Foods said it has nearly $850 million secured in debtor-in-possession financing to continue regular operations until the deal is finished.

Source: Dean Foods Files for Bankruptcy, Hopes To Sell to DFA | Farm Journal’s MILK Business

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Dean Foods, one of the largest milk processors in the country, filed for bankruptcy on Tuesday and is in purchasing talks with Dairy Farmers of America, a huge co-op.

This is one of those situations that surprised me but didn’t surprise me, if that makes any sense. I knew Dean has been in financial trouble for some time, and there were rumors going back months already that it was looking around to try to sell itself. But I didn’t think the company’s financial situation was quite this bad.

Dean has been struggling for a long time. It lost a major contract with Walmart not too long ago. Dean had been supplying the retailer with milk under the Walmart house brand, and lost a major part of that market when Walmart opened its own milk processing facility. Dean’s major problem is that it has always been a supplier of liquid (drinking) milk and that market has been shrinking for decades. Dean has never been able to adapt to that. It’s tried various things, tried rebranding, different products, even tried investing in plant based alternatives to milk, but nothing ever really worked very well for the company. It hasn’t made a profit in over two years, and that just couldn’t go on any longer.

I find myself wondering how much longer milk as a beverage is going to hang around as a major factor in our diet. For at least twenty or thirty years now the consumption of beverage milk has been declining, and all the hype and propaganda being pumped out by the various milk marketing boards and the dairy industry hasn’t managed to reverse that trend.

Oh no, he’s off on a rant…

Politics and how to fix it. Sort of. Maybe.

I don’t talk about politics in this blog for a lot of reasons. Primarily because we’re already drowning in it every day, it seems. But I think there is one thing we can agree on, and that is that our current system is badly broken. Can it be fixed? I think it could be and a major part of fixing it would be fairly easy to do, and that’s regulating how politics is funded.

We are not a democracy. The US is a representational government. The people themselves do not decide how the country, its states and local governments operate. Instead we elect representatives who are supposed to govern the country according to the wishes of the people who elected them. Unfortunately this system is broken because more often than not what influences how our elected representatives govern us are not the voters who elected them, but special interest groups, corporations and the wealthy who funnel obscene amounts of money into the politicians’ campaigns, and as such wield an enormous amount of influence over what those politicians do.. We don’t have a government that represents the voters any longer, we have a government that represents whoever has enough money to buy it.

So what would be a fairly simple fix? It’s easy, really.

First – Only individual persons can contribute financially to politicians’ campaigns, not corporations, companies, PACs, unions, etc. Many will claim that this somehow violates people’s rights. This is a lie. Corporations, etc. have no rights. They are not people. They are a legal fiction. A corporation is nothing but a collection of rules and regulations that are intended to make operating as a business easier. Period. It has no rights except those specifically granted by the law to operate as a business. The individual people who work for that organization have rights, yes. But the corporation or other entity does not. This is in no way would eliminate the rights of anyone. But it would go a long, long way to avoid concentrating large amounts of money in the hands of PACs, businesses, etc. that could then use that money to unfairly influence elections.

Politicians will respond that they need that money to run their election campaigns. I will put this bluntly – bullshit. If they would spend the time they now spend schmoozing with lobbyists, attending $5,000 a plate “dinners” where the wealthy bribe their way in to get up close to candidates, and begging money from corporations and the wealthy, etc., and instead spent that time in their home districts actually talking to the people who elect them, they wouldn’t need a fraction of the money they need now.

Second – only individuals actually living in a politician’s home district can contribute financially to a politician’s election campaign. People, PACs, corporations, unions, etc. who are outside of the home district of the politician have no damn business trying to influence an election. Period. The politician in question is supposed to represent the wishes of the voters who elected him or her, not some political action committee in D.C. or multi-national corporation or wealthy individual who doesn’t even live in the state or district of the politician they’re contributing to.

For decades now almost every election of any importance in this state gets flooded with money by PACs, special interest groups, and wealthy individuals trying to influence how a state they don’t even live in is governed. And the amount of money we’re talking about is almost scary. We’re not talking thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars, we’re talking tens of millions. A certain mining company, for example. made a single contribution of almost three quarters of a million dollars to a dark money pac that supported politicians in Madison that were trying to gut the state’s mining regulations. The only reason the public found out about it was a clerical error. That almost certainly wasn’t the only “contribution” they made to that PAC or other similar organizations specialize in what basically amounts to money laundering, i.e. covering up who is giving how much to who. Cutting off funding from these outside sources would go a long way to making politicians more responsible to the people who they are supposed to be representing.

There. Rant mode off. I’m going to go back to posting pictures, talking about amateur radio and farming and gardening again.

Cheap Amateur Radio. The FT-450D and holy s**t it’s cold! And some flowers and stuff

Okay, can we stop with this nonsense already? It’s only Nov 8, for pete’s sake! Normally we don’t get really cold weather and snow until mid to late December. Usually it’s in the mid 30s to low 40s this time of year and you can still go outside without freezing your bits off. Last night it was 10 degrees. Night before that it was 11 degrees. And snow? Really? A lot of years we’re lucky if we have snow by Christmas. In the last two weeks we’ve had a total of about 12 inches here. Most of that melted off, thank goodness, but now that the temperatures have plummeted it’s sticking around.

There’s so much we didn’t get done outside this fall. Between MrsGF’s knee surgery and everything else that’s been going on, I just didn’t have time to get everything done. I didn’t get some of the dahlias dug up, so those are probably going to be a total loss. Didn’t get any of the leaves raked because I was waiting for both the pear tree and the maple in the backyard to shed their leaves. Only they didn’t this year for some reason. It’s been a strange, strange autumn.

On the plus side, MrsGF’s Christmas cactus is in full bloom and it’s gorgeous. I know a lot of people who just can’t get these things to blossom no matter what they do, but MrsGF has a real knack with plants. I’m not sure what it is. I suspect she could take an old, half rotted twig, shove it in the ground, and in a few weeks it would turn into a healthy tree. This thing just keeps going and going. Some years it blooms twice.

And she has a rose bush in the living room this year, also in full blossom, in November. I don’t know how she does that, either. But it does make me grin like an idiot to have a rose in full bloom while it’s 10 degrees and snowy outside.

But I was really going to talk about amateur radio stuff when I started all of this so let’s get on with this…

Yaesu FT-450D hooked to the SCU-17 interface. It’s been in production for a while but it’s still one heck of a nice little radio for the money

Oh, before that, though, I thought I’d just throw this in even though it has nothing to do with the headline starting this off. This is what it looked like here on Oct 31 a little after 6 AM.

Last day of October in Wisconsin.

Now I know this is Wisconsin and the weather here is a bit, well, odd, but still, really? Ick.

Now, finally, the amateur radio stuff!

The Dilemma

Whenever I start talking to someone about amateur radio, whether they’re other amateur radio operators or people who know nothing at all about it, invariably the topic turns to cost, and it becomes clear immediately that a lot of people, including a lot of hams, think that amateur radio is way too expensive. A lot of people I know who would otherwise be interested in getting into the hobby think it’s so expensive they could never be able to afford it. And that simply isn’t true.

I can’t really blame them for thinking that because some of this equipment is indeed expensive. The top of the line transceivers that the manufacturers and owners love to show off can quickly push up into the $5,000+ range or more. The Kenwood TS-990 sells new for just under $8,000 and iCom makes one that sells for more than $12K, for heaven’s sake. Once you add in other things that you may think you need, if you believe the ads, like amplifiers, computers, morse code keys, etc. you can quickly end up sinking $15,000 or more in a top of the line set up.

But here’s something the manufacturers don’t want you to know:

You don’t need any of that high priced junk.

Seriously. You don’t. If you want to get on the air on the HF bands (shortwave) you don’t have to spend a fortune. That little Yaesu in that photo up there costs literally less than one tenth of what my TS-990 costs new, and to be perfectly honest, does everything you need. Granted, it doesn’t have all the bells and whistles the 990 has, doesn’t have the fancy displays and all that, but when it comes down to actually communicating, those bells and whistles aren’t really necessary and the 450 will do everything you need.

I was looking for a fairly full featured, small, full power (100 watts output), 12V powered transceiver to lug out to field day and special events or whenever I feel like it, in situations where the little low powered 818 wouldn’t do the job. I love that little 818, but let’s face it, with a maximum of 6 watts output (3 watts or less running digital), any kind of communications using it is going to depend more on luck than anything else. I ran across someone talking about the 450 and it sounded like a nice little transceiver so I looked into it more and decided it was just what I needed. It sells new for about $750 – $800 which is, as I said before, one tenth of the cost of my TS-990. You can find them used for about $500 or even less if you look around.

And for that price what you get is not some stripped down little radio, either. This thing has a lot of features, including a built in antenna tuner, decent filtering, good noise reduction features, etc. In fact, just about everything you might need in an HF transceiver is packed into this little unit. True, it doesn’t have many of the goodies my 990 has, but I have to admit that in real life I don’t use a lot of those goodies anyway. If this were the only transceiver I had, I would be more than satisfied with its capabilities.

But for me the main question was how well was it going to work using digital modes like PSK, FT8 and JS8Call because those are pretty much the only modes I use. And it turned out it deals with digital very, very well indeed. It took me all of 10 minutes to get it up and running with the SCU-17 you see sitting on top of it in that photo. It was just a matter of plugging in the cables, setting the baud rate in the menu, firing up the computer and setting things up in the software there, and I was on the air. Now granted I had only just fairly recently set up the Yaesu 818 with the same interface, computer and software, so I already had experience working with Yaesu equipment which certainly made it easier. But still, for me, getting a rig up and running on digital modes in under 10 minutes is a bit of a miracle, really. It took me days to get my TS-2000 working properly with digital modes when I first started this years ago.

It’s currently set up in the basement, hooked to the Titan Gap vertical antenna, and it’s been doing a very, very nice job. I’ve made contacts all over the place with it using JS8 and FT8, putting out about 40 watts.

Sidenote: The 450 may be capable of putting out 100 watts, but you never run full power in the digital modes on any transceiver because the power ratings of all transceivers are seriously misleading. Those maximum power ratings they give you are for single side band, which does not stress the transmitter in the radio. With SSB you’re actually averaging far less power output than advertised. Your signal may peak at 100 watts, but you’re actually averaging 50 – 60 watts or so because of how SSB works. Unlike SSB, most digital modes are considered to be 100% duty cycle. A general rule of thumb is when using digital, always dial your power levels back to less than 50% of the radio’s maximum. Sometimes the recommendations are as low as 25%. Otherwise you risk overheating the radio and damaging it.

Anyway, I’m very pleased with this little radio. I didn’t really expect much from it when I got it, and it has certainly exceeded all of my expectations. I’ve been having a lot of fun with it, and I’ve been using it more than my TS-990 of late.

Lets see, what else? Oh, yeah. This showed up courtsey of our friendly UPS delivery person the other day.

I picked up a Raspberry Pi 4 to play with to join the RPi 3s I’ve already been playing with. I have a specific goal for this one. There are Linux versions of FT8 and JS8Call that, I’m told, run just fine and dandy on the RPi. I’ll find out this winter as I experiment. My eventual goal is to put together a compact QRP digital system that is backpackable that I can take along when I’m out on the trails with the bicycle. I’d thought about configuring the Rpi as a tablet computer with just a touch screen and no keyboard. I’ve done that before with the Rpi3s I’ve had, but I think that might be a bit awkward, so I’m looking at compact keyboards and maybe a small trackball or touchpad for mouse control. We’ll see. This is still very much a work in progress.

I know, I know… The used Lenovo laptop I picked up was supposed to serve that role, and it does, but while it works just fine it is also big, heavy and clumsy to lug around. I can squeeze a RPi into a package not much bigger than a small tablet computer and a fraction of the weight. We’ll see how it goes.

And that’s about it for now. I’ve been boring you long enough with this.

I’m bored so here are some old photos…

It’s about 3 AM, I can’t sleep, I’ve been sorting through old photos, so why not post some? I’ve been all over the US on the motorcycle over the last, oh, fifteen years or so, usually with MrsGF but sometimes alone. Here are some of the photos.

Coast of Maine near Portland
Manitowoc Wisconsin
Devil’s Tower

These two are Portland, Maine. I have very few photos of the town itself for some reason. Oh, and those cobblestone streets are utterly horrible on a motorcycle.

My backyard.
Apostle Islands. Don’t remember which one.

I was in Sundance, WY and went outside the motel in the evening, and this little stinker came prancing up to me in the parking lot and started to climb my leg demanding I pay attention to her.

The Badlands in South Dakota. I’m fascinated with the place and have stopped there a dozen times or more when I’m in that area. I must have hundreds of photos and none of them really express how astonishing the place really is.
Little Bighorn National Monument. The white markers show where the US troops bodies were found. Red granite markers show where the Native Americans remains were found shortly after the battle. I’ve been there three or four times and it is a very somber place. The whole area has a very strange feel to it.

I was Wrong! Class III Breaks $20 On Wednesday | Farm Journal’s MILK Business

Class III milk futures turned in another solid round of trade Wednesday jumping 29 cents in November and 38 cents in December.

Source: Class III Breaks $20 On Wednesday | Farm Journal’s MILK Business

I scoffed at reports some months back that claimed milk prices would climb to levels that are almost comfortable for dairy farmers. I shouldn’t have. Milk prices on the commodities markets have hit 20.18 for November and 19.73 for December.  Of course that’s the price on the commodities market, not the price farmers are actually getting for their milk. That varies widely for a variety of factors. But for the first time in a long time dairy farmers are finally starting to get a price that might let them make a bit of profit and get some of their debt paid down.

TRS-80, a Bit of Computer Nostalgia

TRS-80 Mod IV with dual floppy drives and a whopping 64K RAM. Note the front edge of the keyboard. Radio Shack was notorious for this battleship gray paint they used on their computer cases that started to rub off almost immediately exposing the even uglier plastic underneath. We went through this for something like 4 generations of computers before RS finally just started using colored plastic like everyone else.

I have a lot of elderly computers laying around that probably should have gone to recycling long ago, and probably will. I hang on to some of the because of nostalgia, like the one up above. That’s one of two TRS-80 Model IVs that have been kicking around here for ages now. I worked on a lot of these dopey things in the early 1980s, along with its predecessor the Mod III. All things considered, it was a pretty darn nice computer for its day, if a bit on the expensive side. And they did have some “issues”, as they say, thanks largely to some quirky design decisions made by Radio Shack that were probably done to save money.

Not exactly what you’d call a ‘high tech’ video system, even for that era. Basically it’s a cheap, generic black and white television without the tuner or audio.

They were made as cheaply as they could possibly be made (The TRS-80 Mod I came with a video display that was literally an old RCA black and white television with the channel tuner and audio circuits stripped out of it, for example.).

Yummy yummy RAM chips! Guacamole dip costs extra. Despite the Tandy Corporation brand, they were made by Motorola.

I had a couple of Mod III computers, and basically the Mod IV was little more than an enhanced III. And they were expensive. The III sold for, I think, about $800 with a whopping 16K RAM, and RS wanted an arm and a leg to upgrade it to a full 48K. (That’s all you could add to the Mod III) I don’t remember exactly what RS charged to upgrade to 48K, but it was a ridiculously high price. $180 sticks in my mind for some reason. Anyway, you could easily do the upgrade yourself for about a quarter of what RS charged. RS was selling the exact same RAM chips in blister packs at their stores. Total cost for that was about $30-$40. All you had to do was open the case, pop the chips in, and that was it.

The interesting thing is that you actually couldn’t use all of that memory even if you had it, so the memory claims were very misleading. The system ROMS (the computer’s basic operating system) were mapped into the system’s memory map, replacing the first 16 of RAM with the ROMS, so you actually only had access to 48K. If you used a disk drive, then TRS-DOS, the disk operating system, sucked up even more memory. Unless you used a non Radio Shack OS, you couldn’t use more than about 32K – 48K (which was the maximum you could have on the Mod III). So why load the computer up with memory you couldn’t use? Because RS was trying hard to push the computer at the business market, and a lot of businesses were running CP/M. RS didn’t actually sell CP/M for the Mod IV (at least I don’t think they did) but you could get it from other companies. But this was also the time when CP/M became obsolete thanks to the introduction of the IBM-PC and MS-DOS. Radio Shack/Tandy started out as a leader in the personal computer business, but because of an unwillingness to spend money on serious R&D they quickly fell behind and were desperately trying to keep up until they finally washed their hands of computers all together.

RS/Tandy sold the Xenix OS (a UNIX clone) for their business models like the Mod-6. They were bigger, better, faster, had 8 inch floppy drives and you could get hard drives for them. But they were expensive, clunky, and non-standard in just about every way. I have a Mod 6 and a Mod II laying around somewhere too and one of these days when I get bored enough I’ll open one of those up.

Speaking of floppy drives – my, aren’t those dirty… Actually the whole thing looks like it’s been sitting in a barn for the last 30 years. For all I know it was. Or is this the one that got soaked when my 50 gallon aquarium broke one night and the water poured through the floor into the storage area in the basement?

See? Didn’t believe me about the cassette tape, did you?

Those are some real pieces of junk, gems, those drives up there. Genuine single sided, double density, 5 1/4 inch floppies, those are. And holy fright they were expensive when they were being sold! I don’t know what the ones for the Mod-IV went for, but the drives for the Mod-III were ridiculously expensive. But then floppy drives were expensive across the board back then. The Mod-III was mostly sold bare bones when it first came out. You could get it ‘fully loaded’ with dual floppies and 48K of RAM but not many people bought the drives at first because they were so expensive. The ‘standard’ configuration was 16K RAM and a cassette tape player was used to store programs and data. Seriously. Cassette tape. You can imagine how well that worked.

The first drive, which contained the required floppy drive controller adaptor, sold for about $1,200. Adjusted for inflation that’s almost $3,000 today. The second drive sold for about $800.

These floppies are single sided, double density, so they could store a whopping 180K on a single floppy disk. That’s 180 thousand bytes. Not even enough to store a single average sized JPEG photo.

Oh, and did I mention that floppies back then cost up to $5 to $10 each? The company I worked for back then sold genuine IBM brand floppy disks. They sold for “just” $10 each. We’d give you a deal, $95 for a box of ten. I just paid about that much for a 4 terabyte drive for pete’s sake. But at the time I was selling 5 megabyte hard drives to businesses for a cool $5,000 each. Considering what prices were like back then I’m surprised anyone ever bought one of these things. Adjusted for inflation that hard drive would sell today for over $12K.

This is what ran the whole show, the Z80 CPU. Most of the really popular computers of the day like the Apple ][, Commodore 64, Atari 400/800, etc. used the 6502 processor in their equipment. They used it not because it was good (it wasn’t), they used it because it was cheap. The Z80 was more expensive, but it was also more powerful. It had a better register system (it had some 16 bit registers which the 6502 lacked), more registers, better indexing, better instruction set, etc. It was more expensive, yes, but it more than made up for that with its capabilities. I’m not sure why RS decided to go with the Z80, but they did, and they kept using it for a rather long time. It served as the primary processing power for the Mod I, Mod II, Mod III, Mod IV, and the Mod-100. RS did use other processors as well. It used the 6809 in its “toy” computer, the Color Computer (ironically, the 6809 in their toy color computer was a much, much more powerful processor than the Z-80 used in their ‘professional’ computers)

The picture above shows the main board of the Mod IV. This was the first time I’ve had a Mod IV open (back in the day Mod I, Mod III and Atari were the ones I mostly worked on. By the time the Mod IV came out I’d switched to the Color Computer and OS9) and I was a bit disappointed when I saw this, well, mess is the only way you can describe that board. If you look closely at that photo you’ll find jumper wires hand soldered to various points all over the board. The backside of the board is just as bad. More wires running everywhere. And most of those don’t look like repairs or modifications, they look like they were done at the factory. When I see a main board with jumpers running all over like that it makes me nervous. It means either the circuit board was badly designed in the first place, or they found serious bugs in the hardware after it went into production and they had to pull them off the line and do some pretty serious rewiring to get them working, or they were trying to make modifications without bothering to redesign the circuit board. I don’t know what’s going on here, but if I’d opened up my brand new Mod IV and saw this it wouldn’t exactly inspire confidence.

Radio Shack/Tandy sold a lot of computers back then, but it also made a lot of mistakes, some of them serious. Once the IBM-PC was introduced, RS tried to compete in the business market with the Model 6, which was, for the time, a very sophisticated, multi-user system that sported a 5 meg hard drive, and the Xenix operating system. But it was also very, very expensive and if you wanted to do anything that couldn’t be done with the very limited selection of software available for it, required you to hire a professional programmer to write it for you. They brought out a line of PC clones which had a whole host of problems and were generally more expensive than other equipment with the same specifications. Basically they did just about everything wrong that they could do, and ended up abandoning the computer business entirely. Now the company is gone completely, for the most part.

That’s all for now. One of these days I might talk about the Tandy Color Computer. That was the Radio Shack computer I was the most involved with back in the day. Despite the fact most people looked at it as little more than a toy, it was an amazingly sophisticated computer once you got past the ridiculous operating system Radio Shack crippled it with. Most of us back then chucked Radio Shack’s OS in the trash and ran a multitasking, multiuser operating system called OS9

Fall Wrap Up

Although the temperatures are still ridiculously warm for this time of year, there’s no doubt that autumn is here and the gardening season is winding down and it’s time to look back at what worked, what didn’t, and start making plans for next year.

The tomatoes are pretty much done for the season. We’ll probably still get about 15 lbs or so off the last remaining plants and then we can clean out the raised beds. The tomatoes weren’t as good as I’d really have liked to see, but we still got more than enough to stock our shelves. There was a bit of blossom end rot at the start of the season, but we’d been doing calcium supplementation and that kept it from being a real problem.

One of two shelving units covered with canned stuff. A few of these are from last year but most were done in the last couple of weeks, plus almost as many on the other shelf. Gee, you might get the impression we like tomatoes around here…

The tomatoes all were canned in one way or another this year. We didn’t freeze any because the freezer is packed solid. We did pasta sauce, tomato soup and just plain canned tomatoes for use in things like chili. I didn’t keep track of how many pints and quarts we put up, but it was a hell of a lot. I think we used just about every jar we have. Our big canner can hold 16 pints in a batch, so it really doesn’t take long to do it. I’m writing this as I’m waiting for another batch of 14 pints to finish up.

Those dahlias I picked up for half price in June turned out way, way better than I could have hoped. Amazingly beautiful, long lasting flowers, and they’ve been in perpetual bloom since early July.

That stuff up there inside of those yellow buckets (the bottoms are cut out) is celery. The buckets protect them from critters and makes weed control easy. Works very well indeed and we’ve been growing celery like this for some time. We’ve been cutting celery off those plants since, oh, early August, I think. Cut a few stalks off and it just keeps regrowing. Incredible flavor, too. The thing with commercial celery is that it has little or no flavor. That’s not the case with the home grown stuff. The celery flavor is intense. Very intense. It kind of surprises people who’ve only ever had the commercially grown variety.

I talked before about the mild jalapeno pepper plants I planted in pots on the front porch as an experiment. That worked out beautifully as well. The two plants produced more than enough peppers to keep me satisisfied (I’m the only one who really likes jalapenos so just two plants were enough). And the flavor was very good indeed. They had the right flavor, but very little heat, just what I was looking for. The plants are pretty much done for the season, so I’ll pick the remaining peppers and the plants will go to the compost pile this weekend probably.

Two more successes were the wax beans and the bell peppers. The wax beans are in the front, the peppers behind them. We’d put in a row of green beans, but something ate all of the plants almost as soon as they sprouted, but whatever it was left the wax beans alone. The wax beans more than made up for it though. Great flavor, good texture, and ridiculously prolific. We’ve been picking beans every four or five days since early August and there’s no end in sight, they’re still in full blossom and producing beans.

The bell peppers seem to always do good in this location. We’ve been getting absolutely beautiful peppers off the plants this year. They’ve been well formed, growing to almost ridiculously large sizes, thick walls, firm texture, good flavor. A lot get eaten fresh but we’ve been dicing up and freezing some as well.

No pears this year.

Not everything was successful, though. We aren’t going to get any pears off our tree this year. The tree looks nice and healthy, but almost no fruit. The problem was the weather. When the tree was in full blossom the weather was still ridiculously cold and wet, so it didn’t get pollinated. In fact, I didn’t even start to see bees until two or three weeks after the three blossomed. Earlier in the year I counted about 20 or so pears on the entire tree. There are maybe fifteen up there now, and I saw today that something is eating them while they’re still on the tree. Birds, probably.

The other disappointment is the squash. It started out well but went nowhere fast. Only one plants looks reasonably healthy, but it’s much smaller than it should be and only has a couple of gourds on it. The other plants are much worse, with a few very undersized gourds that will probably end up in the compost. We get lots of blossoms, but very little fruit. I think this is the last year we’re going to try growing squash. It just doesn’t work out for us.

We need to start doing garden clean up much earlier than we normally wood. MrsGF is going in for knee replacement surgery in early October so we want to have everything done that we possibly can before then because after that, well, trying to get anything done outside is going to be awkward because I’m not going to want to leave her alone in the house with a bum leg while I’m out puttering in the gardens.

We’re already talking about putting in a third and maybe even a fourth raised bed for vegetables next spring. They just work amazingly well and are so much easier to take care of than a regular garden plot would be. We’ll probably keep putting veggies in the corner where the beans and peppers are, but the rest of our yard? The soil is so poor and gets so water logged in rainy conditions that it’s difficult, even impossible to grow much of anything except ornamentals.

That’s it for now. Time to pull the jars out of the canner and start cleaning things up.

Let’s see, what else? I’m putting together an evaluation of a new transceiver I just picked up a couple of weeks ago, a Yaesu FT-450D. I hear so many people complaining about how expensive amateur radio is that I wanted to do an article proving that it really isn’t anywhere near as expensive as people think it is, and the 450 is at the core of that piece.

Moving all my equipment to the new location in the basement is about half done, but is now on hold because of MrsGF’s upcoming surgery. I can’t be hiding down in the basement while she’s recovering from knee replacement, so I’m going to be leaving the big equipment up here so I have something to play with while keeping an eye on her and making sure she isn’t trying to do something she shouldn’t. I know her, and I know damn well that she’s going to try pushing things too far, too fast.

And here’s a picture of a cat. Just because.